Postponed: KCBH 2020 Conference

Dear All,

Due to the current situation regarding COVID-19 we have decided to postpone the 2020 KCBH Annual Conference which was due to be held on the 8th of July on the theme of ‘Minorities and Majorities in British History.’ The TCBH Pimlott Memorial Lecture has also been postponed. Alongside TCBH we hope to rearrange both of these events for summer 2021.

We are discussing potential alternatives to this years event and hope to have news about these shortly.

 

Primary Sources for Dissertation on WWII and British Historiography

Dear All,

Dr. Kit Kowol, who teaches the module ‘The Never Ending War: Britain and the Second World War, 1939-2019’, has a student, Lewis Hickmott, who is in need of help!

Lewis is working on the way in which the Empire’s contribution to the war effort was described in books on British history written in the post-war period. He had hoped to get these from the British Library but, for obvious reasons, can’t go there…

If anyone has any of the following works and might be able to scan some relevant pages we would be incredibly grateful.

You can contact Lewis by email – lewis.hickmott[at]kcl.ac.uk or on twitter @IncognitoWizard

Many thanks in advance!

The books Lewis is after are:

 

  • Arthur Bryant, A History of the Britain and the British People  Vol III The Search for Justice (London, 1990)
  • Arthur Bryant, English Saga (1940)
  • Arthur Bryant, The Battle of Britain: The Few (1944)
  • Arthur Marwick, Britain in the Century of Total War (Harmondsworth, 1970)
  • A.J.P. Taylor, The Second World War, (1974)
  • Basil Collier, The Defence of the United Kingdom (1962, Official history)
  • Basil Collier, The War in the Far East 1941–1945 (1969)
  • Correlli Barnett, Britain and Her Army, 1509–1970 (Allen Lane, 1970)
  • John Frederick Charles Fuller, The Second World War, 1939-1945: A Strategical and Tactical History (London, 1948)
  • William R. Lewis, Imperialism at Bay, 1941–1945 (Oxford, 1977)
  • Max Beloff, Wars and Welfare: Britain 1914-1945 (London, 1984)
  • Stanley Woodburn Kirby, India’s War Against Japan (1957)
  • William Roger Lewis, “The Road to the Fall of Singapore, 1942: British Imperialism in East Asia in the 1930s” (The Fascist Challenge and the Policy of Appeasement, 1983)
  • H. E. Marshall, Our Island Story: A History of Britain for Boys and Girls

 

Centre for British Politics and Government event – After the Defeat: Lessons from history for Labour? – Weds 18 March

On Wednesday 18 March, the Centre for British Politics and Government, in conjunction with the IHR Contemporary British History Seminar, is hosting ‘After the Defeat: Lessons from History for Labour?’. The event will take place in Bush House Lecture Theatre One (S)1.01 from 4 to 6pm.

In this event a panel of historians – including Professor Andrew Thorpe – will reflect on how the Labour, Conservative and Liberal parties have responded to previous heavy electoral defeats. They will also seek to determine what, if any, lessons the current Labour Party – on the back of winning its fewest number of seats in Parliament since 1935 – can learn from these.

Three speakers will provide papers on the response of each of the main parties to a particular election defeat:

  • Dr Iain Sharpe will discuss the Liberal Party’s experiences at the turn of the 20th century and the influence of Herbert Gladstone in securing its return to power at the 1906 election
  • Professor Andrew Thorpe (Leeds) will discuss Labour’s response to its defeat in 1935
  • Dr Michael Kandiah (KCL) will discuss the Conservative Party and how it dealt with losing power in the 1945 general election

IHR Britain at Home and Abroad Seminar: Spring 2020

It is with great pleasure that King’s is once again hosting the Institute of Historical Research’s ‘Britain at Home and Abroad, 1800-‘ Seminar.

The seminar is open to everyone and offers the chance for all those studying, working on, or simply interested in contemporary Britain to hear the latest exciting research on the topic. One of the few times and places in which historians and scholars from across London and the South East can regularly come together the Seminar also has a lively social life associated with it…

Convenors: Lise Butler (City), David Edgerton (KCL), Kit Kowol (KCL), Charlotte Riley (Southampton), Jack Saunders (KCL), Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (UCL), Natalie Thomlinson (Reading).

All seminars are on Thursday and start at 17:15, unless otherwise stated.

 

23rd January, Jack Saunders (KCL) , ‘Assembling Cultures: Workplace Activism, Labour Militancy and Cultural Change in Britain’s Car Factories, 1945-82’, KCL, Bush House – South East 2.01

 

6th February, Lyndsey Jenkins (Oxford),  ‘‘Nothing read of the squalid, the sexy and the sordid’: education, Christianity and socialism in the formation of working-class feminist identity, c.1890-1905’, KCL,  Strand Building – S -1.04

 

20th February, Agnes Arnold-Forster (Roehampton), ’Emotions & Work in Contemporary Britain: Talking to Surgeons about their Feelings, c.1970-present’ , KCL, Bush House – South East 2.01

 

12th March, Jenny Pleinen (German Historical Institute London), ‘The landed gentry in British politics after World War Two: From taxed decadence to subsidized cultural heritage’ , Public lecture at German Historical Institute (joint event). N.B. Start time 17:30

19th March, Fariha Shaikh (Birmingham), ‘Catherine Helen Spence’s Autobiography: Literary Culture and Associational Life in Nineteenth-Century South Australia’, KCL, Bush House – South 2.01

IHR ‘Britain at Home and Abroad’ Seminar Series, Autumn 2019

Below is the schedule for this semesters Institute of Historical Research (IHR) ‘Britain at Home and Abroad’ seminar series. The seminars bring together scholars from across London and the South East working on all aspects of modern and contemporary British history since 1800.

Appropriately, this semester the seminars are being held at Bush House. Today part of King’s College London, Bush House was formerly the home of the BBC World Service. Please note that the last three seminars are in a different room from the first two.

For directions and information on getting to Bush House see, https://www.kcl.ac.uk/visit/bush-house

Britain at home and abroad, 1800 –

Autumn 2019 programme

 Seminar convenors: Lise Butler (City), David Edgerton (KCL), Kit Kowol (KCL), Charlotte Riley (Southampton) , Jack Saunders (KCL), Florence Sutcliffe-Braithwaite (UCL), Natalie Thomlinson (Reading).

 

All seminars start at 5 for 5:15 and finish at 7pm.

Thursday 3 October 2019 – Roundtable on diversity in our field: RHS Gender and Race reports plus class and LGBTQ+: Meleisa Ono-George (Warwick), Eve Worth (Oxford), Charlotte Riley (Southampton) and Rebecca Jennings (UCL).  Seminar to be held at KCL, Bush House (S) 2.05

 

Thursday 17 October –  Luke Blaxill (Anglia Ruskin University), ‘Text Mining Modern British Political and Social History. A presentation of computerised linguistic analysis techniques applied to Victorian electioneering, postwar women MPs’ speeches, and interwar public health reports’. (Bush House (S) 2.05 )

 

Thursday 31st October – Chris Bischoff (University of Richmond), ‘Judging Freedom: Special Magistrates and Emancipation in the British West Indies’. (Bush House (SE) 1.06 )

 

Thursday 14th November – Katrina Moseley (University of Cambridge), ‘Thigh Anxiety? Weight loss clubs and women in Britain, c. 1967–1990’. (Bush House (SE) 1.06)

 

Thursday 28th November – Jack Saunders (KCL), ‘Assembling Cultures: Workplace Activism, Labour Militancy and Cultural Change in Britain’s Car Factories, 1945-82’. (Bush House (SE) 1.06)

Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture 2019

Britain and the making of Global Order after 1919

Tuesday 9th July 2019, 6:30 p.m.

Edmond J. Safra Lecture Theatre, King’s College London, Strand, London

Patricia Clavin is Professor of International History at the University of Oxford, and Zeitlyn Fellow and Tutor at Jesus College. Her books include Securing the World Economy. The Reinvention of the League of Nations (Oxford, 2013), and Internationalisms. A Twentieth-Century History (edited with Glenda Sluga, Cambridge, 2017).

On the centenary of the Paris Peace, Patricia Clavin (Oxford University) explores Britain’s pivotal role in the development of a rules-based global order. The lecture reveals how Britons fashioned the practices and norms of new international institutions, including the League of Nations, to manage relations between states, markets and civil society. Drawing on the correspondence of key internationalists – including women usually excluded from the canon of international thought – it uncovers how economic, social and even environmental issues took on as much
importance as the more familiar concerns of border protection and weapons’ control as Britain searched for security in its relations with the Empire, Europe and the USA.

All Welcome
Free Admission, but booking is essential
Reception to Follow

About the Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture

The Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture is hosted by Twentieth Century British History, OUP Journals and King’s Contemporary British History. This lecture series was established in 2006 in honour of the late Ben Pimlott and in association with the Institute of Contemporary British History, with which Ben had close ties. Each lecture is published in the journal and is available free online.

For more information see:

https://academic.oup.com/tcbh/pages/pimlott

About the KCBH 2019 Annual Conference

This event is taking place alongside the King’s Contemporary British History annual conference, this year on the theme of ‘Britain’s Futures’.

For more information and registration see:

https://kcbh.kcl.ac.uk/2019/03/27/kcbh-conference-2019/

Please note it is not necessary to register for the conference in order to attend the Pimlott lecture. However, all those who do register for the conference will also be automatically registered for the lecture.

Pimlott Lecture – 9 July

On the evening of 9 July, KCBH will co-host the Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture 2019, with Twentieth Century British History and OUP Journals. Professor Patricia Clavin will deliver the lecture,  entitled, ‘Britain and the making of Global Order after 1919’.

On the centenary of the Paris Peace, Patricia Clavin (Oxford University) explores Britain’s pivotal role in the development of a rules-based global order. The lecture reveals how Britons fashioned the practices and norms of new international institutions, including the League of Nations, to manage relations between states, markets and civil society.  Drawing on the correspondence of key internationalists – including women usually excluded from the canon of international thought – it uncovers how economic, social and even environmental issues took on as much importance as the more familiar concerns of border protection and weapons’ control as Britain’s searched for security in its relations with the Empire, Europe and the USA.

This event is free, but booking is essential

Urban history book launch roundtable

KCBH are delighted to host an event, ‘The New Urban Political History’, which will take place in the River Room, KCL on 10 July, from 11.00am-1.00pm. (The morning after the KCBH conference).

 

Details below:

“The New Urban Political History”

This event announces the debuts of three important new books. These innovative works tackle major historical problems through a distinctively urban lens. The result is urban history as political history, promising fresh insights for both.

Chair: Erika Hanna, University of Bristol

Simon Gunn, University of Leicester, and Susan Townsend, University of Nottingham: Automobility and the City in Twentieth-Century Britain and Japan (Bloomsbury, 2019).

Guy Ortolano, New York University: Thatcher’s Progress: From Social Democracy to Market Liberalism through an English New Town (Cambridge University Press, 2019).

Otto Saumarez Smith, University of Warwick: Boom Cities: Architect Planners and the Politics of Radical Urban Renewal in 1960s Britain (Oxford University Press, 2019).

Each of the authors will briefly introduce a book other than their own. We will then invite a wider discussion of what this ‘new urban history’ can tell us about the emerging economic, social, and political histories of 20th century Britain.

This event is free, but booking is essential: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-new-urban-political-history-book-launch-roundtable-tickets-61734876678

KCBH Conference 2019

 

 

 

This is the third annual KCBH conference. This year our theme will Britain’s Futures – the ways in which hoped for or feared futures were articulated. Our expectation is that a discussion focused on the projects, promises and plans of the past will enrich our collective understanding of both British history and how it has been written.

Our four themed discussions, on National and Imperial futures, Social futures, Economic futures, and Political futures, will be led by, among others:

Clarisse Berthezène, Lise Butler, Sabine Clarke, Alana Harris, Kit Kowol, Helen McCarthy, Helen Parr, Charlotte Lydia Riley, Emily Robinson, Catherine Schenk, Bill Schwarz, Peter Sloman, and Richard Toye.

PIMLOTT LECTURE: On the evening of 9 July, KCBH will co-host the Ben Pimlott Memorial Lecture 2019, with Twentieth Century British History and OUP Journals. Professor Patricia Clavin will deliver the lecture, which will be entitled, ‘Britain and the making of Global Order after 1919’. Anyone who signs up for the KCBH conference is free to attend the Pimlott Lecture

This event is free, but booking is essential.

England on the Verge of Brexit: Lecture by John Denham

England on the Verge of Brexit: Brexit was made in England; but will England be re-made by Brexit?

Lecture by John Denham

19 March, 6.30-8pm / Nash Lecture Theatre, King’s College London, The Strand, London WC2R 2LS

Brexit was a very English decision. Yet England was barely mentioned in the referendum campaign nor in its fractious aftermath. It remains a nation whose name is unspoken. 

This lecture will explore the roots of England’s discontent in its governance and constitutional status and the failure to tackle the nation’s economic and social divides. John Denham will argue that, unless these challenges are addressed during Brexit and its aftermath, the underlying tensions will only grow.

Prof John Denham is Director of the Centre for English Identity and Politics at the University of Winchester. He is a former Labour MP and Cabinet Minister.

The lecture is jointly hosted by King’s Contemporary British history and English Labour Network. It is the inaugural event in KCBH’s England series.

To attend, please register at Eventbrite here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/england-on-the-verge-of-brexit-john-denham-tickets-57032846780

The Study of Contemporary British History at King's College London